CONTENT:
The subject matter itself; key concepts, facts, events, which may be presented with a map in three formats:
  1. Discipline-Based: Focus on subjects: math, science, social studies, literature, arts, physical education, etc. Should be active: students as “scientists”; as “artists”
  2. Interdisciplinary: Focus on connections between two or more subjects examining common organizing center
  3. Student- Centered - Focus on student developed interests. Emerges directly from learner
What is a concept? Why are they so critical to learning and to mapping?
  • A concept is a relational statement that provides the focus and basis for acquiring knowledge.
  • Concept based learning sustains long term recall of facts vs. isolated fact base learning.
  • A concept is synonymous with the enduring understanding or big idea.
Example:
A science unit on the Rain forest might focus on the concept:
  • In the natural world there are systems comprised of interdependent component parts.

SKILLS
Skills are displayed on a map as ACTION VERBS.
  • Precise skills that can be:
    • Assessed/measured
    • Observed
    • Described in specific terms
  • Skills are action verbs…
  • Unlike general processes
Examples: Precise skills in Science will include:
  • Observe and make notations of an event in the natural world or space
  • Collect and displaydata
  • Cite significant variables
  • Pose explanations
  • Predict future results
ASSESSMENT: Assessment is the demonstration of learning; the products and performances used as evidence of skill development and content understanding.
  • Assessment is the demonstration of learning
  • Assessment is the observable evidence
  • They must be listed as defined nouns:
  • Tangible Products or
  • Observable Performances
Leads To:
DIAGNOSIS:
FINDING WHAT OUR LEARNERS NEED FROM THE ASSESSMENT DATA
PRESCRIPTION:
REVISING OUR MAPS COLLABORATIVELY TO RESPOND TO THOSE TARGETED NEEDS