• Always put the needs of the students first.
  • Use a checklist in the early stages of planning to help stay organized
  • Using a software package to create your map will make life simpler. It is worth the time and investment to buy it and learn how to use it.
  • Carefully consider who will be on the planning team, keeping in mind personalities and work styles.
  • Designate one or more person(s) to monitor progress and to keep the project moving forward.
  • Expect some resistance to change, allow some room for people to express criticism, and be prepared to address concerns. Provide reassurance and set a positive tone early.
  • Express appreciation for everyone’s efforts.
  • Communicate regularly with the broader community who may not directly be a part of the mapping process. This can help to build consensus and may also reveal any potential sources of resistance or constructive suggestions.
  • Use the map to encourage and simplify professional collaboration and interdisciplinary units.
  • Use the map to help new teachers get oriented.
  • Prepare. Learn as much about mapping as you can before you begin (books, websites, interview people who have done it, etc.) Timelines and sample maps are available.
  • Your completed map is a living document. Plan to revisit and revise it on an ongoing basis, and allow time for this.
  • After your map has been in place for a while, ask users and creators to identify the ways in which it has helped. Communicate those improvements to the community.
  • Think big, and make it fun!